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Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.


-- Matthew 25:40, NIV

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These are ways for you to get involved to help the persecuted in China. Click any of the links below to start helping the Chinese Church today.


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Write to imprisoned prisoners of conscience to provide encouragement and send a signal to prison officials that there are people all over the world who care for these brave imprisoned.


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Raise your voice with other supporters and sign petitions to tell top-ranking Chinese authorities that these cases will not be forgotten.


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One of the most powerful ways that you can support the persecuted church is through a monetary donation. You can give to a specific program with a one-time gift or set up a monthly donation.


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ChinaAid president Bob Fu to Tell Congressional Hearing of Worsening Religious Persecution Against Christians in China



Wednesday, May 21, 2014

China Aid Association

UPDATED AT 9:35 a.m. CDT, May 22, 2014

(Washington—May 22, 2014) China's Communist regime has escalated its persecution of Christians since the beginning of this year, but the U.S. government has abandoned its founding principles in its failure to hold Beijing accountable for its human rights violations, ChinaAid president and founder Bob "Xiqiu" Fu is to tell a Congressional hearing on Thursday.

Fu was invited by Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ), chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, to testify at its hearing on the topic: "Protecting Religious Freedom: U.S. Efforts to Hold Accountable Countries of Particular Concern."

China was named "a country of particular concern" in this year's annual report of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, an independent federal advisory body. A "country of particular concern" is defined by U.S. law as "countries where particularly severe violations of religious freedom are tolerated or perpetrated." The USCIRF named China and 15 other countries, including North Korea, Burma, Iran and Nigeria, "countries of particular concern." China has been given that designation for 15 years running, ever since the USCIRF was created in 1999.

In Fu's prepared text, he gives detailed accounts of persecution cases against Christians and churches that have taken place across the breadth of China. The government has even targeted its own state-sanctioned "Three-Self Patriotic" churches in its crackdown. One of the most well-publicized cases was the razing of the Sanjiang Church in coastal Zhejiang province.

In his prepared remarks, Fu notes that the United States was founded by Christians fleeing religious persecution who made protection of religious freedom and other God-endowed human rights a founding principle of the nation. But in its failure to speak up against the religious persecution of Christians in China, the United States has abandoned its founding principles, Fu says.

The open hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m. in Room 2200 of the Rayburn House Office Building. The proceedings will be broadcast live on the committee's website at www.foreignaffairs.house.gov.

Other witnesses are to include Robert P. George, chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom; Kenneth E. Bowers, secretary, of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of the United States; and Amjad M. Khan, national director of public affairs for Ahmadiyya Muslim Community USA.


China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Website: www.chinaaid.org