Featured News



ChinaAid News



Related News


In the News


Walking with the persecuted faithful


Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.


-- Matthew 25:40, NIV

Make a Difference


These are ways for you to get involved to help the persecuted in China. Click any of the links below to start helping the Chinese Church today.


Write Letters

Write to imprisoned prisoners of conscience to provide encouragement and send a signal to prison officials that there are people all over the world who care for these brave imprisoned.


Act Now

Sign Petitions

Raise your voice with other supporters and sign petitions to tell top-ranking Chinese authorities that these cases will not be forgotten.


Act Now

Donate

One of the most powerful ways that you can support the persecuted church is through a monetary donation. You can give to a specific program with a one-time gift or set up a monthly donation.


Act Now

Be Encouraged


Testimonies and words of encouragement from ChinaAid supporters:


Get Connected


Find out how you can stay in touch with ChinaAid:


ChinaAid on Social Media


Subscribe to Daily News Update


Subscribe to Monthly E-Newsletter:


Human Rights Watch: G20: Press China to Free Nobel Laureate



Thursday, July 6, 2017

Human Rights Watch
July 5, 2017 9:27 a.m. EDT

■ Liu Xiaobo Largely Isolated in Hospital in Shenyang

(Brussels) – World leaders attending the G20 Summit should press Chinese President Xi Jinping to immediately free the gravely ill Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, Human Rights Watch said today. China should allow Liu and his wife, Liu Xia, to freely choose whether to receive medical treatment in China or abroad. The G20 Summit of 20 major economies takes place on July 7-8, 2017, in Hamburg, Germany.

The Nobel Prize-winning writer Liu Xiaobo before his arrest,
photographed by his wife, Liu Xia, in 2008. © 2008 Private
“China’s brutal and inhuman treatment of Liu Xiaobo has not lessened even after his terminal illness was reported,” said Lotte Leicht, European Union director at Human Rights Watch. “The G20 summit is a critical moment for some of the world’s richest nations to demonstrate that they won’t sit idly by while one of their peers acts with deliberate and unrestrained cruelty.”

Since the news of Liu Xiaobo’s illness became public on June 26, virtually no information has been released about him. Although Liu was formally “released on bail for medical treatment,” the hospital where he is being treated in Shenyang, Liaoning province, is heavily guarded by Chinese security. So far only Liu Xia and possibly her brother, Liu Hui, have been allowed to see him.

The media have reported that the Chinese government told foreign diplomats that Liu is too ill to travel, but no independent medical experts have been allowed to evaluate his condition. On July 5, the Shenyang Bureau of Justice announced that China has invited doctors from Germany and the United States to come to China to help treat Liu, which it said it had done at the request of the couple and the doctors treating them[PS1] .

The couple had earlier communicated through close friends their wish to go abroad for treatment. The authorities previously released a video and articles showing Liu Xiaobo being given “meticulous care” and Liu Xia and Liu Hui thanking the doctors. It is unclear whether they were aware of being filmed or had given consent to having the footage released.

Liu Xiaobo has been imprisoned since 2008 for his pro-democracy activities. During that time, authorities have kept Liu Xia under house arrest without legal grounds and detained Liu Hui on dubious fraud charges, though they later released him on bail.

Several governments – including the United States, Canada, and France – have publicly offered to host the pair for treatment, while others, including the European Union and Germany, have made statements calling for his release and right to receive medical treatment at a place of his choosing. A German government spokesman, Steffen Seibert, said that “in such a difficult situation, a humanitarian solution for Liu Xiaobo should be the highest priority” for China’s government. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein, met with Chinese officials on June 30 to discuss the case.

Other G20 governments have yet to speak out publicly on Liu’s case.

Members of the G20 include Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the US, and the EU.

“An economic superpower is holding hostage a terminally ill Nobel laureate for its self-serving policies of abuse and repression,” Leicht said. “The G20 Summit may be world leaders’ last best chance to press China to act with humanity and let Liu Xiaobo and Liu Xia go.”


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here