Breaking News:
Partner with ChinaAid to Free Yang Hua
Huang Yizi talks on the phone during
his time in police custody.
(Photo: China Aid)
China Aid

(Wenzhou, Zhejiang—Feb. 17, 2017) The pastor of a house church in China’s coastal Zhejiang province feared he may be re-arrested when he responded to a police summons on the morning of Feb. 3.

After Huang Yizi, the pastor of Fengwo Church, was released on bail a year ago, he expressed his concern that he would be taken into custody again, saying, “Please pray for me. I will not return if they want me to do something that contradicts the law, the truth, my belief, or my conscience. If I am really sentenced during the [Lunar] New Year, sisters and brothers [in Christ], please believe that I always have a clear conscience toward God and my fellow men.”

At 5 p.m. that day, Huang updated his friends, saying he had been allowed to return home, but the issue the police wanted to address had not yet been solved. However, he did not discuss the contents of their conversation and asked for prayers.

In an interview with a China Aid reporter on Feb. 3, Huang’s wife said he had received the summons the night before, and that the police had been summoning him like this since he was bailed out of prison last year. She and several other local Christians believe that he was ordered to come to the police station because Feb. 5 marked the one-year anniversary of his release. According to Chinese law, if he is found not in violation of bail rules, he may remain free, but, if officials determine that he has violated those precepts, he may subject to arrest.

More than two years ago, officials targeted Salvation Church’s cross as a government-endorsed beautification campaign raked across Zhejiang, pegging church buildings and crosses for demolition. When more than 600 of them arrived on the site on July 21, 2014, however, a wall of Christians met them, and conflict erupted as authorities tried to break through. More than 50 church members were injured, with 14 requiring medical attention. To protest this mistreatment, Huang and a group of Christians visited the local government. 10 days later, he was apprehended and charged with “gathering a crowd to assault a state agency.” Later, the charge was altered to “gathering a crowd to disturb public order.” He was tried on March 24, 2015, and sentenced to one year in prison, and released on Aug. 1, 2015.

On Sept. 12, 2015, just six weeks after his release, authorities unexpectedly took Huang back into police custody on trumped up charges of “stealing, spying on, buying or illegally providing State secrets for institutions, organizations and people outside the country.” He was denied permission to see his family and meet with a lawyer, and officials even denied relatives the opportunity to send him necessities, such as money and clothes.

He was released on bail on Feb. 5, 2016.

China Aid reports abuses, such as those experienced by Huang, in order to stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
President Trump's tweet about meeting with Lilian
Tintori. (Photo: Courtesy of Jared Genser and
Donald Trump)
China Aid

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 17, 2017) In celebration of the major political headway carved by the wives of Venezuelan political prisoners in Washington, D.C., this past week, China Aid urges international leaders and governments to speak out on behalf of all the world’s prisoners of conscience, including those jailed in China.

According to an e-mail penned by Jared Genser, the founder of Freedom Now and the managing director of Perseus Strategies, LLC, Lilian Tintori and Mitzy Ledezma, the respective wives of incarcerated Venezuelan dissident Leopoldo López and detained Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma, traveled the U.S. capitol on behalf of their husbands this week. Opening his statement with “I have seldom had such a mind-blowing week in Washington….” Genser proceeds to describe the whirlwind of events that culminated in Tintori meeting with and garnering the support of President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence, among other prominent officials.

After his meeting with Tintori, Trump tweeted a message urging Venezuela to immediately release López.

These events come in the midst of tightening tensions between the two governments, as the U.S. recently moved to sanction Venezuelan Vice President Tareck El Aissami for his alleged involvement in the drug trade. Since Trump and Pence have now set a precedent of speaking out in favor of Venezuelan prisoners of conscience while the relationship constricts, China Aid presses them and other government officials to consistently prioritize the rights of imprisoned dissidents in China and around the world over appeasing these countries in favor trade deals and economic gain.

López, who is serving a 13-year prison sentence for utilizing “subliminal messages” to incite violence, entered solitary confinement last year and is suffering various injustices, including denial of reading and writing materials, being strip searched 10 times per day, and having every conversation recorded. In one instance, guards coated his cell with buckets of feces and cut off his water supply in order to prevent him from cleaning it.

Genser’s e-mail can be read in full below.

China Aid congratulates Lilian Tintori and Mitzy Ledezma on their success in Washington, D.C., and hopes that someday religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law will be upheld in every country, including China.



Dear Friends,

I have seldom had such a mind-blowing week in Washington, with the visit of Lilian Tintori, the wife of imprisoned my client and Venezuelan prisoner of conscience Leopoldo López. It culminated in an Oval Office meeting with both President Trump and Vice President Pence, thanks to Sen. Marco Rubio (Trump Tweet below). While the Trump Administration is under fire on a wide array of topics, in a single week, it has abandoned the failed engagement policy of the Obama Administration on the U.S.-Venezuela relationship. And this dramatic turn was exactly what was needed.

(Photo: Courtesy of Jared Genser)
When Lilian and I met Vice President Biden in early 2015, he promised Lilian directly that the US would not support any further dialogue with President Maduro without first securing the immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners. And yet just months later, the Obama Administration abandoned this position and began supporting a dialogue facilitated by the Vatican and UNASUR. With no imposed benchmarks, timelines, or consequences for inaction, the results were no surprise - but engaging in that process removed international pressure on Venezuela as governments and international organizations all deferred action to see if the process could work. Over that time, the number of political prisoners rose from 80 to almost 110.

Meanwhile, Leopoldo has been imprisoned for almost three years of a 13+ year prison term for having used "subliminal messages" to inspire people to violence. He has been held in solitary confinement for more than a year, is strip searched 10 times a day, is denied access to most reading materials and to materials he can write with. He even had his cell covered by buckets of feces thrown in by guards and had his electricity and water shut off so he couldn't clean anything up for more than a day. And all his conversations are recorded, even with his lawyers.

As he sits in jail, Leopoldo is outpolling President Maduro in a hypothetical presidential matchup by more than 30 percentage points. Also joining Lilian on this trip was Mitzy Ledezma, the wife of detained Caracas Mayor Antonio Ledezma.

(Photo: Courtesy of Jared Genser)
As Lilian and Mitzy arrived in Washington, the Treasury Department sanctioned Venezuela's sitting Vice President as a drug kingpin. President Maduro tried to publicly dismissed this action as merely a remnant of the Obama Administration. The Oval Office meeting was a dramatic rebuke to that assertion. President Trump embraced Lilian with a big hug and both he and the Vice President were very engaged, asked a lot of questions, and sought her advice on how the United States could most effectively advance the democratic aspirations of the Venezuelan people. While much more will be required, it couldn't have been a better week.

We had an otherwise jam-packed schedule, highlights of which are below.

Best,

Jared


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Zhu Yufu
(Photo: China Aid)
China Aid

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 16, 2017) U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren addressed the House of Representatives on behalf of an arrested Christian democracy advocate today.

Hultgren, collaborating with the Defending Freedoms Project, “adopted” political prisoner Zhu Yufu in order to spotlight the experiences of him and others who face persecution for expressing their opinions. In a speech made to the United States House of Representatives on Feb. 15, Hultgren highlighted Zhu’s unjust imprisonment, saying that his health has deteriorated acutely under official care, causing his family to fear he may not live, and urging the Chinese government to free him, provide him with proper medical care, treat him humanely, and respect and uphold “freedom of speech, and assembly, and thought, and belief.”

Zhu, who has endured multiple prison sentences on account of his pro-democracy stance, was sentenced to seven years in prison in 2012 after he published a poem encouraging Chinese people to rise up against the Communist Party and shape the future of China themselves, entitled “It’s Time.” In custody, he has suffered poor treatment, including being beaten by a police officer until he blacked out last Saturday.

Hultgren was recently appointed Co-Chairman of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission and serves as a commissioner to the Helsinki Commission and the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. His full speech can be viewed here.

China Aid exposes abuses, such as those suffered by Zhu, and celebrates efforts made by Representative Randy Hultgren and other politicians to free prisoners of conscience in order to stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
The Gospel Herald
By Leah Marieann Klett
Feb 13, 2017 05:43 pm EST

■ Florida Senator Marco Rubio has criticized the Chinese government for its continued crackdown on religious freedom and called for the release of two human rights attorneys, Jiang Tianyong and Tang Jingling.

Rubio, the chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, met with the wives of the two lawyers last week as part of a China Aid delegation, and took the Senate floor last week to draw attention to their plight and urge his colleagues to work towards their freedom.

Marco Rubion serves as the chairman of the Congressional-
Executive Commission on China
Reuters/Carlo Allegri
"The Chinese people yearn for the protection of their most basic human rights, and bravely stand with their fellow marginalized and oppressed countrymen," Rubio said. "They are China's greatest asset, not its biggest threat, as the government and Communist Party wrongly believes. Any government, any government, which views its own people with such fear and hostility will, as has often been said, find itself on the wrong side of history."

Jiang, a 45-year old lawyer, was disbarred by the Chinese government because of his vigorous human rights advocacy, including his representation of blind legal advocate Chen Guangcheng, fellow rights lawyer Gao Zhisheng, Falun Gong practitioners and other human rights cases.

"Despite the risks of this work, he has been steadfast in his support of the families and of their rights to lawyers and legal advocates caught up in China's sweeping nationwide crackdown on the legal community in July 2015, which ensnared roughly 250 lawyers and activists," Rubio said.

Jin Bianling, Jiang's wife, last heard from her husband on the evening of Nov. 21, 2016, as he prepared to board a train back to Beijing after visiting the family of Xie Yang, an incarcerated human rights lawyer.

However, when the train arrived the next morning, Jiang was not aboard, and officials later announced that he was being held at an undisclosed location. To this day, Jiang has not been allowed visits from his family or access to a lawyer.

"All of these realities underscore that China remains a country of rule by law," Rubio said. "As such, lawyers, advocates, dissidents and others often find themselves in the Party's crosshairs, persecuted under the law, rather than protected by it, and they have no recourse for justice."

In turn, Tang entered police custody on suspicion of "inciting subversion of state power" in the weeks leading up to the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre. In January 2016, he and two other prisoners of conscience were tried, and Tang was sentenced to five years in prison.

Following his conviction, Tang shared how his faith sustained him in the midst of injustice: "The Holy Bible has a passage that reads: ‘Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake.' Today, we have been pronounced guilty, thrown in prison, separated from our families, and have endured humiliation and difficulties-and I am far from being able to convince or prove to others how these tribulations could have become my blessings. But God's will is inevitably difficult to understand. I often pray and ask him to give me more strength, so that I may persevere until the moment of revelation. I dare say, in 2011, while in a secret jail, and now in detention, almost every day I have passed has been calm and fulfilling. I have never lost my direction."

Rubio concluded his address by urging government officials to take up the causes of those who suffer from persecution in China.

Officially, China is an atheist country, but constitutionally guarantees religious freedom. However, authorities are wary of all religious organizations, viewing them as threatening forces. Currently, the Party is believed to have around 88 million members, whereas there may be up to 100 million Christians in China today.

China is ranked 39th on Open Door USA's World Watch List of 50 countries where Christians face the most persecution.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Premier
By Premier Journalist
Tue 14 Feb 2017

A Christian political prisoner was attacked by a police officer because his beard was too long.

According to China Aid Zhu YuFu, 65, was confronted by a police officer about the length of his beard on 11 February.

Zhu attempted to explain that his razor had been locked away before the officer attacked him, causing him to hit his head on concrete and lose consciousness.

Zhu had to be given emergency medical treatment for his injuries.

He already suffers with heart disease and a number of other blood and vascular ailments.

His wife Jiang Hangli was prevented from visiting him in the prison in Zhejiang province that morning and found out the details about his ordeal after she was eventually allowed to see him later that day.

Zhu was a founder of the Democracy Wall movement, a political group that campaigned against government corruption and human rights abuses. He also published a monthly magazine about politics.

He was first convicted of trying to subvert state power in 1999 and served a seven-year prison sentence.

He was arrested again shortly after his release and charged with obstructing government business.

Zhu became a Christian in 2010. He is currently serving a seven year prison sentence.

Because of his declining health, his family fear that Zhu may die in prison but all requests for medical parole have been denied.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
The Gospel Herald
By Leah Marieann Klett
Feb 14, 2017 12:47 pm EST

■ A police officer in China attacked a sick and elderly political prisoner over the length of his beard, causing him to black out, a disturbing new report has revealed.

Christian lawyers, human rights activists, pastors and
churchgoers have all suffered as a result of the Communist
Party's ongoing crackdown. AP Photo
China Aid reports that when Jiang Hangli, the wife of 65-year-old political prisoner and China 18 member Zhu Yufu, went to see her husband at Zhejiang No. 4 Prison on the morning of Feb. 11, she was turned away. At the time, authorities told her that Zhu, who suffers from hyperlipidemia, heart disease, severe hypertension, lumbar disc hernia, cholecystitis, prostatitis, and various other diseases, was connected to an IV and unable to visit with her.

However, when she met with Zhu later that day, he told her that a police officer had confronted him earlier that day about the length of his beard. When Zhu explained to the official that the razor was locked up, the man unexpectedly accosted him. The back of his head hit concrete, and he blacked out, causing his blood pressure escalate.

In a letter, Zhu's wife urged authorities in charge of prisoner management to "take actions to guarantee the safety of Zhu Yufu and keep him safe from violence" and to punish the police officer responsible for assaulting her husband.

"Do not insult Zhu Yufu or force a confession from him," she wrote. "He is old and sick. I hope the prison can give him better treatment considering his situation and offer him nutritious food."

She added, "Treating political prisoners well shows a country's international image, its political civilization, and the authority's benevolent rule."

Zhu reportedly founded the first pro-democracy movement in Communist China, the Democracy Wall, a pro-democracy publication entitled April 5 Monthly, and the China Democracy Party in addition to serving as the general secretary of the Standing Working Group of Zhejiang Preparatory Committee of China Democracy Party and a member of the Preparatory Committee of National Preparatory Committee.

Because of this, he was arrested and charged him with "subversion of state power," on Nov. 2, 1999, and he received a seven-year prison sentence. After he was released in 2006, Zhu was arrested again in 2007 and was sentenced to two years on a falsified charge of obstructing government business.

In 2011, he was arrested once again after he wrote and distributed a poem encouraging people to take to the streets around the time of the Arab Spring protests, according to Human Rights in China.

"It is time, people of China! It is time," the poem read. "The square belongs to us all; our feet are our own. It is time to use our feet to go to the square and to make a choice . . . We should use our choices to decide the future of China."

Zhu was subsequently sentenced to seven years in prison and deprived of political rights for three years.

In a separate interview with Radio Free Asia in 2016, Zhu's sister, Zhu Xiaoyan, said that because of the treatment he has endured at the hands of the Chinese government, his entire family now suffers from psychological problems.

"My brother is a cultivated man. All he wanted was to express some of his opinions on society, but he has suffered persecution at the hands of the Chinese government, not once, not twice, but three times," she said. "Every time I went to see my brother, he was always very strong, telling us not to worry about him. He was going to serve his time in this Communist Party jail.

She continued: "But the last time I went to see him, he seemed to be in a trance, as if his spirit had been broken. I felt so bad about that, that I decided I would definitely start speaking out on his behalf. Otherwise he might die in that Communist Party jail."

Florida Senator Marco Rubio, who also serves as the chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, last week argued on the Senate floor that the U.S. should take action to stop China's human rights abuses and urged officials to take up the causes of those who suffer from persecution in China.

"The Chinese people yearn for the protection of their most basic human rights, and bravely stand with their fellow marginalized and oppressed countrymen," Rubio said.

"They are China's greatest asset, not its biggest threat, as the government and Communist Party wrongly believes. Any government, any government, which views its own people with such fear and hostility will, as has often been said, find itself on the wrong side of history."


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
A notice from the Dali Public Security Bureau announces that
Tu Yan’s case has been transferred to the procuratorate for
further investigation. The notice is addressed to Ren Quanniu,
Tu’s lawyer.
China Aid
Originally reported in Chinese by Qiao Nong. Translated by Carolyn Song.

Updated on Feb. 17, 2017, at 4:01 p.m.

(Dali, Yunan—Feb. 14, 2017) Authorities in China’s southern Yunnan province detained a Christian woman, accusing her of cult crimes late last year, according to an update on Feb. 7 from her lawyer.

Tu Yan, a Christian originally from Hunan province, was doing ministry work in Dali, Yunan on Oct. 22, 2016, when officers from the public security bureau arrested her and four other Christians, including her boss and a 24 year-old Christian woman named Su Min. Tu and Su were charged with “using a cult organization to undermine law enforcement.” Though three of those detained were released on bail, Tu and Su’s cases were instead transferred to the procuratorate for further investigation.

Ren Quanniu, Tu’s lawyer, told China Aid’s reporter on Feb. 7 that he had visited the public security bureau on Jan. 12 with Tu’s father and sister, requesting she be released on bail. Though they were told the officers would respond at a later date, they have still received no answer, nearly a month later.

Ren also petitioned the procuratorate to reexamine the grounds for Tu’s detention.

Despite Tu’s insistence that she is a Christian, the public security bureau claimed she was a member of the cult organization “Three Classes of Servants.” In order to prove this hypothesis, the procuratorate gathered 12 files containing 2,400 pages of falsified evidence, which Ren examined and found repetitive.
Tu claimed she’d heard of a similar occurrence in Chuxiong City, Yunnan, when two clergywomen who were accused of cult involvement for doing ministry work.

China Aid reports on the arrests and detentions of Christians like Tu Yan in order to expose illegal government interference and religious freedom abuses in China.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
The Epoch Times
By Larry Ong, Epoch Times |
February 9, 2017 AT 5:48 pm
Last Updated: February 10, 2017 12:03 pm

■ The crime is appalling and beggars belief—prisoners of conscience in China are being cut up for their organs while still alive in a massive state-run operation.

Filmmakers who move past disbelief to action—interviews with researchers, eyewitnesses, doctors, and straight-talking politicians—have in recent years produced compelling documentaries on organ harvesting in China.

(harvestedalive.com)
Millions of people in several countries around the world have since learned of the Chinese communist regime’s forced organ harvesting of tens of thousands of Uyghurs, Tibetans, house Christian, and Falun Gong prisoners of conscience from the documentaries in private screenings and on national television. The power narratives also have won recognition in the form of dozens of awards, including the prestigious George Foster Peabody Award.

Harvested Alive: Ten Years of Investigation” is the latest organ harvesting documentary to receive acclaim in winning the Hollywood International Independent Documentary Awards best foreign documentary feature category for January 2017.

Produced by Deerpark Productions and released in November 2016, “Harvested Alive” is a Chinese language documentary centered around the primary source research of organ harvesting by the World Organization to Investigate the Persecution of Falun Gong (WOIPFG), a United States-based nongovernmental organization.

Wang Zhiyuan, the president of WOIPFG and a former aviation doctor in China, said in the film that he was shocked but skeptical of the first account of forced organ harvesting in 2006 by the wife of a Chinese doctor.

“It went beyond common sense,” Wang said. “This was too serious, and the scale too big.”

After discussions with other WOIPFG members, Wang decided that they should immediately start investigations “with an open mind” and without drawing any conclusions from their opinions.

For the next 10 years, Wang and the others scoured hospital and government websites, as well as media reports, for evidence of organ harvesting. They also made countless secretly recorded phone calls to Chinese hospitals, doctors, judges, and even top Chinese officials in the government and military.

Some Chinese doctors openly declared that Falun Gong practitioners were source of organs. A former top military health officer, Bai Shuzhong, was recorded declaring that former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin had ordered the organ harvesting of practitioners.

“At the time, it was Chairman Jiang. There was an instruction to start this thing, organ transplantation,” a voice that WOIPFG identified as that of Bai said in the recording played in the documentary. In videos online, Bai Shuzhong sounds identical to the voice in the recording.

Practitioners of Falun Gong, a traditional Chinese meditation practice that involves physical exercises and teachings of “truthfulness, compassion, tolerance,” are being targeted by the Chinese regime for persecution since 1999, a decision of Jiang’s.

Inside detention centers and labor camps, practitioners are subjected to regular blood and cornea tests, the purpose of which to allow the regime to facilitate a national organ harvesting system where practitioners are killed to provide organs on demand, according to researchers of organ harvesting.

The slaughter of Falun Gong practitioners for their organs remains very much in action, researchers say.

An English subtitled version of the “Harvested Alive” is currently available for free viewing on the internet. The English language version of the film will premiere in Washington D.C. in March.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Radio Free Asia
2017-02-13

■ A rights activist detained after sporting a satirical T-shirt calling Chinese President Xi Jinping "Xitler" will face trial on subversion charges, as the government told his out-of-town defense team they were barred from representing him.

Ethnic Korean Quan Ping, whose name is also spelled in its Korean form, Kwon Pyong, is being held in a police-run detention center in the northeastern province of Jilin after his initial "disappearance" on Sept. 30 last year.

His case was recently transferred to the Yanbian municipal prosecutor's office, paving the way for Kwon's trial at the Yanbian Intermediate People's Court on Wednesday, his attorney Zhang Lei told RFA.

Kwon faces charges of "incitement to subvert the state power," with the indictment against him focusing mainly on posts he made to Facebook and Twitter, Zhang said.

But the authorities have refused repeated requests from his defense team to meet with their client, saying they must provide a letter of introduction from the justice bureau in the city where their law firms are based.
Activist Quan Ping (l) poses with Hong Kong lawmaker
Leung Kwok-hung, known by his nickname "Long Hair", at a
ceremony commemorating the Tiananmen massacre, June
2016. RFA

"It looks as if the Yanbian Intermediate People's Court plans to go ahead with the trial after stripping us of our status as his defense attorneys," Zhang said.

"We told them that to require this is against the law and is far from being a reasonable demand, because we're not the employees of the justice bureau ... so there is no requirement for them to write a letter of introduction for us," he said.

"As things stand at the moment, I really don't think they'll be allowing us to attend court for the trial."

Pressure to drop case

Another of Kwon's attorneys, Liang Xiaojun, said he had already been approached by justice bureau officials from Beijing, who had tried to persuade him to withdraw from the case of his own accord.

"I just got back from the justice bureau, who wanted to talk to me about this case, because they had received a report about it from [Yanbian]," Liang said.

"They told me that they hoped I wouldn't get involved in this case, which was 'complicated'," he said.

Yanbian authorities are claiming that the extended requirements for defense lawyers to be accepted by the court only apply in cases where there are "national security concerns," like subversion cases, Liang said.

"They say we must have a letter of introduction, but there's no way [the justice bureau] will issue one for us," he said.

An employee who answered the phone at the Yanbian Intermediate People's Court declined to comment when contacted by RFA on Monday.

"You need to contact the education and propaganda department. I'm not authorized to give out updates on cases," the employee said.

Freedom of expression?

Repeated calls to the education and propaganda department rang unanswered during office hours on Monday.

Zhang Lei said he had already filed a complaint with the Yanbian prosecutor's office over the court's additional "requirement."

He said he will also appeal to the Jilin High People's Court and provincial-level prosecution authorities.

An online activist surnamed Jiang in the eastern province of Jiangsu said he believes Kwon Pyong is innocent.

"[What he did] falls within the parameters of freedom of expression," Jiang said. "The incitement charge simply doesn't stand up."

"This has nothing at all to do with the government."

Reported by Xin Lin for RFA's Mandarin Service, and by Ng Yik-tung and Sing Man for the Cantonese Service. Translated and edited by Luisetta Mudie.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Christian Today
Harry Farley
13 February 2017

■ Donald Trump's one-time rival for Presidential nominee has used his role on the Senate to speak against China's ongoing persecution of Christians.

The Florida senator highlighted the cases of two detained human rights attorneys, Jiang Tianyong and Tang Jingling.

The Republican senator Rubio spoke in Senate last week on
the issue following a meeting with the wives of the detained
lawyers. YouTube / Marco Rubio
Jiang's wife last heard from him almost four months ago when he disappeared after visiting another lawyer who had been jailed. He boarded a train home on November 21 but never arrived, according to persecution charity China Aid.

Officials later announced he was being held at a undisclosed location and has not been allowed visits from his lawyer or family since.

Tang was one of dozens arrested in the build up to the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre. The 1989 protests were marked in June 2014 and Tang was detained beforehand on suspicion 'inciting subversion of state power'. In January 2016, he and two other prisoners of conscience were tried, and Tang was sentenced to five years in prison.

Rubio urged White House officials to take up these and other cases with their Chinese counterparts.

He said: "Inside the grand edifice of the court, we can see stately and ornate furnishings and decorations, and we can see the government employees in dignified attire. But we cannot see the law and we can definitely not see justice."


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Zhu Yufu
China Aid

(Wenzhou, Zhejiang—Feb. 13, 2017) A policeman attacked a sick and elderly political prisoner on Saturday, the inmate’s wife learned when she went to visit him in China’s coastal Zhejiang province.

Authorities refused to allow Jiang Hangli, the wife of political prisoner and China 18 member Zhu Yufu, arrived at Zhejiang No. 4 Prison on the morning of Feb. 11, to see her husband until the afternoon, saying he was currently connected to an IV on account of his high blood pressure. However, when she met with Zhu later that day, he told her that a police officer had confronted him earlier that day about the length of his beard. After Zhu explained to the official that the razor was locked up, the man unexpectedly accosted him. The back of his head hit concrete, and he blacked out. His blood pressure spiked to 120/230 mmHg, and he was given emergency medical treatment.

Zhu also suffers from hyperlipidemia, heart disease, severe hypertension, lumbar disc hernia, cholecystitis, prostatitis, and various other diseases.

In a letter Jiang wrote yesterday, she claims China often charges political prisoners, including her husband, with “inciting subversion of state power.” Zhu, who founded the first pro-democracy movement in Communist China, the Democracy Wall, a pro-democracy publication entitled April 5 Monthly, and the China Democracy Party in addition to serving as the general secretary of the Standing Working Group of Zhejiang Preparatory Committee of China Democracy Party and a member of the Preparatory Committee of National Preparatory Committee. These activities prompted authorities to charge him with “subversion of state power,” on Nov. 2, 1999, and he received a seven-year prison sentence.

After he was released in 2006, Zhu was arrested again in 2007 and was sentenced to two years on a falsified charge of obstructing government business.

On March 5, 2011, he was taken into police custody once more because he wrote and distributed a poem that urged people to take to the streets around the time of the Arab Spring protests, according to Human Rights in China. Subsequently, the Hangzhou Intermediate Court sentenced him to seven years in prison and deprived him of political rights for three years for “inciting subversion of state power.”

Jiang’s letter can be read in full below.

China Aid exposes abuses such as those experienced by Zhu Yufu in order to stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law.



To the Zhejiang province prison management bureau:

I am a relative of political prisoner Zhu Yufu, who is currently serving a sentence in Zhejiang No. 4 Prison for “inciting subversion of state power.” Zhu Yufu is already 65 years old. He has severe hypertension, hyperlipidemia, heart disease, lumbar disc herniation, prostatitis, cholecystitis, and several other diseases. He moves slowly.

On the morning of Feb. 11, I went to the prison to visit Zhu Yufu, but I was told he was on IV due to high blood pressure, and I couldn’t meet with him until the afternoon. When I finally saw him in the afternoon, he told me what happened earlier that day. At around 9:10 in the morning, a prison policeman (about 56 years old, but he is not the policeman assigned to manage Zhu) had an argument with Zhu regarding the length of his beard. The police asked him to shave his beard immediately. Zhu told him the shaver is locked in the prison and is difficult to get. Then the policeman decided to give him a difficult time. Without any warning, he was forcibly attacked by the police. The back side of his head hit the concrete, and he passed out immediately. That caused his blood pressure to rise to 120/230mmHg. The situation got better after emergency medical treatment.

“Inciting subversion of state power” is a typical charge for political prisoners. The international community and laws specially emphasize that political prisoners should receive different treatment from other prisoners and are especially concerned about the extent of infringement of rights of political prisoners. China, as one of the signatories of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights and one of the 23 countries that is a member the international human rights conventions and related protocols, will receive more international condemnations if political prisoners’ treatment continues to be ignored in this country.

I urge the authorities in charge of prisoner management to take actions to guarantee the safety of Zhu Yufu and keep him safe from violence. I urge higher authorities to get the surveillance video from 9:10 a.m. on Feb. 11, 2017, to verify the situation and punish the policeman who attacked Zhu Yufu in order to prevent similar issues from happening again. Do not insult Zhu Yufu or force a confession from him. He is old and sick. I hope the prison can give him better treatment considering his situation and offer him nutritious food.

Treating political prisoners well shows a country’s international image, its political civilization, and the authority’s benevolent rule.

Jiang Hangli,

Relative of Zhu Yufu,

Feb. 12, 2017


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
From left: Bob Fu, Jin Bianling, the wife of human rights
lawyer Jiang Tianyong, Marco Rubio, Wang Yanfang, the
wife of China 18 member Tang Jingling, and translator David
Chen. (Photo: China Aid)
China Aid

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 13, 2017) In the midst of China’s skyrocketing human rights abuses, a delegation hosted by China Aid traveled to Washington, D.C., last week to raise awareness about ongoing persecution and celebrate the courage of those who champion human rights at their own peril.

On Jan. 29, activities began with a worship service at The Falls Church Anglican, where Reverend John Yates introduced China Aid president Bob Fu and prayed over the delegation, which included prominent Chinese human rights defenders. Afterward, the committee held a luncheon at the Peking Gourmet Inn.

The next morning, the delegation met with Eskinder Negash, the Senior Vice President for Global Engagement of the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants, followed by a 1:30 p.m. appointment with Thomas Farr, president of the Religious Freedom Institute, director of the Religious Freedom Project at the Berkley Center on Religion, Peace, and World Affairs at Georgetown University, and the executive director of the Religious Freedom Institute.

Tuesday began at 9:30 a.m. with a meeting with Senator Ted Cruz, after which China Aid hosted a forum celebrating its 15th anniversary, entitled, “Worsening Religious Freedom and Rule of Law in China: What Does That Mean to the United States and Free World?” Held at the Library of Congress and featuring speakers such as Senator Marco Rubio and Congressman Chris Smith, the event addressed China’s human rights and religious freedom abuses and recognized seven lawyers who have routinely sacrificed their own safety to defend targeted individuals with the 2016 Courage Award.

After the forum, the delegation met with Senator John Cornyn.

On Wednesday, Reva Price, Senior Aide to Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, met with the delegation just prior to their trip to the Heritage Foundation. Afterward, they attended the International Lunch for the National Prayer Breakfast, and, in the evening, the National Prayer Breakfast’s Congressional Opening Dinner, which was also attended by Vice President Mike Pence.

The National Prayer Breakfast commenced at 7 a.m. on Feb. 2 and was attended by both Pence and President Donald Trump. Later that day, the delegation met with Ambassador Mike Kozak and Deputy Assistant Secretary Scott Busby of the State Department. Representative Randy Hultgren convened with them at 4:30 p.m.

Freedom House hosted the delegation at 9 a.m. on Friday, and, at 11 a.m., they visited USCIRF, followed by a trip to the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).

China Aid hosts delegations and meets with government officials in order to raise awareness of China’s religious freedom and human rights abuses.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Marco Rubio speaks at a luncheon
celebrating China Aid's 15th
anniversary. (Photo: China Aid)
China Aid

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 10, 2017) Using information garnered from a meeting with a China Aid delegation last week, Marco Rubio took the Senate floor to highlight the suffering of two Christian human rights lawyers Monday night.

After opening his speech with a celebration of the American freedom to agree with or openly resist governmental power, Rubio compared this situation to that of China, whose flagrant abuse of human rights criminalizes those who disagree with the Communist regime. He raised the cases of two human rights attorneys, Jiang Tianyong and Tang Jingling, honoring the requests of their wives, whom he met last week as part of a China Aid delegation.

Jin Bianling, Jiang’s wife, last heard from her husband on the evening of Nov. 21, 2016, as he prepared to board a train back to Beijing after visiting the family of Xie Yang, an incarcerated human rights lawyer. When the train arrived the next morning, Jiang was not aboard, and officials later announced that he was being held at an undisclosed location. To this day, Jiang has not been allowed visits from his family or access to a lawyer.

Tang entered police custody on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power” in the weeks leading up to the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, which China still heavily censors. In January 2016, he and two other prisoners of conscience were tried, and Tang was sentenced to five years in prison.

Quoting Tang, Rubio said, “Inside the grand edifice of the court, we can see stately and ornate furnishings and decorations, and we can see the government employees in dignified attire. But we cannot see the law and we can definitely not see justice.”

Rubio concluded his address by urging government officials to take up the causes of those who suffer from persecution in China.

His full speech can be watched here.

China Aid works with officials such as Rubio in order to stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Radio Free Asia
2017-02-09

■ Fears are mounting once more over the mental health of Liu Xia, artist and activist wife of jailed Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo, after she made an unusual and disturbing phone call to a close friend, defying her strict house arrest at the couple's Beijing home.

Liu managed to dial out from her home, where she is confined for most of the time and cut off from contact with the outside world, on Wednesday night, Beijing-based Tibetan author Tsering Woeser said via social media.

“I am so shocked; I just got a call from Liu Xia, the first in many years," Woeser said via Twitter late on Wednesday.

Liu Xia speaks to visitors at her apartment in Beijing on Dec.
28, 2012. AFP
"I asked her how she's doing, and she said not good, and that she'd just tried dialing out on the off-chance to see if it would work," Woeser wrote.

"Her voice was trembling all over the place."

She said the call was cut off on two occasions, and she only managed a brief exchange with Liu, who she said sounded "far away" and had been drinking.

Guangdong-based rights activist Ye Du, a close friend of the family, said on Thursday that Liu Xia is feeling the effects of long-term, solitary house arrest, and experiences mood swings.

"I have just spoken to Liu Xia by phone," Ye said. "There has been no relaxation of the surveillance measures from the authorities."

"Over Chinese New Year, when everyone else is getting together, she was all alone and under police surveillance," he said.

"Her mood was pretty low, and she had a bit to drink and tried to call Wang Lixiong for a chat. Woeser, who is Wang Lixiong's wife, took the call," Ye added.

Limited contact

Liu Xia was placed under house arrest as soon as Liu Xiaobo's Nobel Peace Prize was announced in October 2010, and has been unable to move around freely or pursue paid work.

Friends and family say their contact with Liu Xia has been severely limited since her brother Liu Hui, jailed for 11 years for "bribery" charges in 2013, was released on bail—with strict conditions attached.

Liu Xia has been warned that her brother could go back to jail if she has any contact with the outside world, including fellow rights activists, foreign diplomats, or journalists.

Ye said Wednesday's phone call was a rare event, as Liu Xia is being controlled by the authorities with constant threats.

"The government is controlling Liu Xia by preventing her from speaking to the outside world by phone, by threatening [to deny] her visits with Liu Xiaobo," he said.

"When I spoke to her just now, she sounded very frail, as if she has no vitality left in her," Ye said.

Severe depression

Liu Xia's lawyer Shang Baojun said she is suffering from severe depression as a direct result of being under house arrest.

"All of the various pressures have had a huge impact on her," he said.

And Beijing-based rights activist Hu Jia said the authorities also control exactly which of her friends she can talk to, when this is allowed.

"She's allowed to call some friends who aren't considered very political sensitive," Hu said. "They are mostly Liu Xiaobo's friends, and they include Woeser and commentator Mo Zhixu. She can't call sensitive individuals, including me, on her phone, nor even Liu Xiaobo's lawyer Mo Shaoping."

"It's a pretty small list [that she can call]," he said.

Hu said Liu Xia has no real freedom at all.

"Here [in China], Liu Xia will never know true freedom, unless there is systemic change here, or political reform," he said.

"The only way she can be free is if we have universal suffrage."

'Really on edge'

Hong Kong activist Yeung Hung, who was once detained for trying to visit Liu Xia at her Beijing apartment, said he was very anxious about her.

"I am really on edge after hearing this news, because it doesn't seem that the authorities have relaxed the restrictions on her at all," Yeung told RFA.

"She's just confined within those four walls, but there's no such thing as a self-sufficient person. She was always going to try to break through her confinement one day," he said.

"A lot of her friends have tried to visit her, but not one has succeeded so far," he said.

More than six years after winning the Nobel Peace Prize, Liu Xiaobo looks unlikely to be given the chance to seek medical treatment overseas, as high-profile dissidents have done before him.

Liu, 60, is unlikely to qualify for parole, because he has never admitted to committing any crime, and friends say he is highly unlikely to accept any deals offered to him by the ruling Chinese Communist Party.

Reported by Ding Wenqi for RFA's Mandarin Service, and by Wong Lok-to for the Cantonese Service. Translated and edited by Luisetta Mudie.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Christian Daily
Lorraine Caballero
08 February, 2017 11:36 am

■ Chinese authorities have expelled more than 60 South Korean Christians for allegedly engaging in missionary activities.

A report said the expelled South Korean Christians were helping North Korean defectors in Jilin Province who were victimized by sex traffickers. However, local authorities reasoned that they were ordered to leave China because they violated the country's law on religion by participating in missionary activities, the Christian Broadcasting Network relays.

In a statement to a South Korean publication, one of the Christians who was arrested but was later set free described how China goes beyond more than just clamping down on illegal missionary activities.

"On the surface, China is restricting illegal mission activities, but they are also tracing bank accounts and investigating whether or not people helped North Korean defectors residing in China," the missionary told the South Korean newspaper.

Last month, China Aid released a summary of religious persecution in China for last year. Based on the report, the Communist Party started promoting the Sinicization of people's religious beliefs. While the previous administration of Jiang Zemin merely encouraged the mutual adaptation of socialism, current president Xi Jinping introduced the idea of pressuring religious groups into conforming to the government agenda.

An elderly man exercises in the morning as he faces chimneys 
emitting smoke behind buildings across the Songhua river in 
Jilin, Jilin province. February 24, 2013
(Reuters / Stringer)
In September, the Chinese government introduced a draft of the Revised Regulations on Religious Affairs, which is the focus of China Aid's report. As part of the changes to be implemented, various measures were enacted to force house churches to register under the state-run Christian organization Three-Self Patriotic Movement.

Christians are not the only religious group affected by the changes in the government's rules on religion. China has imposed a restriction on Muslims' hajj pilgrimage and has injected its own values including "patriotism, peace, the Chinese dream, moderation, morality, and good behavior" into Islamic teachings.

China has defended the restrictions by saying it has been targeted by religious extremist attacks. However, human rights advocates believe that the Communist Party is only using this reason to suppress religious practices.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Christian Today
Harry Farley
Published 08 February 2017

■ More than 60 South Korean Christians are being expelled from China after they helped North Korean defectors.

They are being kicked out after authorities accused them of "missionary" activities – illegal under China's strict restrictions on religious involvment.

"These persons were engaged in missionary activities in violation of the law related to religion," the local officials in Jilin Province said.

Chinese churches are coming under increasing surveillance as
part of the government's sinicization strategy. Pixabay
But one missionary who was arrested and later released described China's clampdown to a South Korean newspaper: "On the surface, China is restricting illegal mission activities, but they are also tracing bank accounts and investigating whether or not people helped North Korean defectors residing in China," he said according to CBN.

The arrests come after China Aid, a Christian charity, published a report detailing the scale of religious persecution in China. It points to a draft of revised regulations on religious affairs published by the Communist Party and says the government is promoting the sinicization – coming under Chinese influence – of religious belief.

As part of the changes introduced, religious activities such as house churches and Muslim's hajj pilgrimage are coming under increasing surveillance by authorities with "patriotism, peace, the Chinese dream, moderation, morality, and good behaviour" being injected into Islamic teachings.

Officials claim the restrictions cut down on religious extremism but human rights activists say they suppress freedom of belief.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
China Aid

(Kunming, Yunnan—Feb. 6, 2017) Nine unlawfully detained Christians were released on bail prior to the Lunar New Year as their lawyers challenge the legality of their detention.

On Nov. 26, 12 Christians were taken into police custody, where four were released soon afterward, but eight received criminal detention sentences for “using a cult organization to undermine the implementation of the law.” Of these eight, four went free on bail.

Around this time another Christian was detained and freed.

After the 30-day detention limit was up, the police station applied to the Procuratorate for permission to arrest the 12 Christians. However, eight lawyers jointly appealed to protest the arrest, and only four people were arrested.

Human rights lawyer Li Guisheng, who is representing one of the detained Christians, attested that the government openly admitted that the Christians had “not done much harm to society” and did not have enough evidence to detain the church members, resulting in their release. He said the government’s initial suspicions likely arose because the Christians were members of the Local Church, a branch of Christianity developed by Watchman Nee and promoted by Witness Lee. Although the government suspects this denomination is a cult, many Christians consider it non-heretical.

In fact, Li and seven other lawyers representing the defendants condemned Article 300 of the Criminal Law of the People’s Republic of China, which identifies cult activities as a danger to the state for lacking legal basis, and said that the Local Church, as a Christian sect, does not violate any laws.

China Aid exposes abuses, such as those experienced by the unlawfully detained church members, in order to stand in solidarity with persecuted Christians and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law in China.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Radio Free Asia
2017-02-02

■ Authorities in southwestern China’s Sichuan province have freed a Tibetan singer jailed for four years for writing songs praising the Dalai Lama and highlighting the hardships of life under Beijing’s rule, according to a Tibetan source.

Amchok Phuljung, whose musical recordings before his arrest were widely popular in Tibetan areas of China, was released from Sichuan’s Mianyang prison on Feb. 2 after serving his full term in prison, a source living in the area told RFA’s Tibetan Service.

“The Chinese authorities informed his family of his release a few days in advance, and warned that people should not come to the prison to welcome him,” RFA’s source said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Tibetan singer Amchok Phuljung is shown in an undated
photo. Photo sent by an RFA listener
“But when Amchok Phuljung arrived in his home town in Marthang [in Chinese, Hongyuan] county that evening, there was a warm reception for him that was attended by a lot of people who offered ceremonial scarves and sang songs in his honor,” he said.

After a short period spent in hiding, Phuljung was taken into custody on Aug. 3, 2012 at a teashop in Sichuan’s Barkham (Ma’erkang) county, and was initially held in secret before his sentencing and transfer to Mianyang prison, where he served his term, the source said.

“Before his detention, Amchok Phuljung released five albums of music that included Tibetan patriotic songs, which raised his popularity among his fans,” he said.

Among the 13 songs released on Phuljung’s fifth DVD were songs praising Tibet’s exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama and exile prime minister Lobsang Sangay, an exile-based friend of the singer told RFA in an earlier report.

Chinese authorities regularly revile the Dalai Lama and Lobsang Sangay as dangerous separatists and harshly punish expressions of support for both men by Tibetans living under Beijing’s rule.

Monk also freed

Authorities meanwhile also freed a Tibetan monk jailed in 2013 after he was linked to a self-immolation protest challenging Chinese rule in Tibetan areas, another source said.

Yonten, aged around 37 and a monk at Thangkor Soktsang monastery in Sichuan’s Dzoege (Ruo’ergai) county, was released on Jan. 31 after serving his full term of three years and six months in prison, RFA’s source said, also speaking on condition he not be named.

“He has returned to his family home and is in sound health, the source said.

“Right now he is resting, and he will soon go back to his monastery to resume his studies,” he said.

Yonten was one of five Tibetans taken into custody following the self-immolation protest of 18-year-old Thangkor Soktsang monk Konchok Sonam, who set himself ablaze on July 20, 2013 while calling out for Tibetan freedom.

Sonam's mother and teacher at the monastery were among the five detained, but were released on July 22 after questioning by police.

Reported by Lhuboom and Lobe Soktsang for RFA’s Tibetan Service. Translated by Dorjee Damdul. Written in English by Richard Finney.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Christian Today
Harry Farley
03 February 2017

■ Two human rights are believed to be the latest victims of China's crackdown on Christians and other dissidents after a charity claims they were tortured in custody.

Li Heping and another lawyer, Wang Quanzhang, were electrocuted several times with electric batons during their first six months in prison, according to the charity China Aid.

Christian pastor Yang Hua has been sentenced to two years in
prison in China China Aid
They were initially arrested on January 20 2016 for "subverting state power" and remains incarcerated at the Tianjin Municipal Detention Center No. 1.

Li's wife told the watchdog he fainted several times due to the severity of the attacks.

Beijing reportedly considers the human rights attorney to be "more dangerous than Bin Laden", according to the Guardian

"Chinese say that they are living inside a prison," he said before his arrest. "If you are detained, you are in a smaller prison. If you are released, you are in a bigger prison."

The emergence of torture by the Chinese regime comes as part of a wider trend attacking Christians, pastors and churchgoers, as well as lawyers.

Zhang Xiuhong, a deacon at the Guiyang Huoshi Church in Guizhou province, was detained by local police in July 2015, according to China Christian Daily.

Last month Pastor Yang Hua, also known as Li Guozhi, was sentenced to two and a half years in prison for "divulging state secrets" after he tried to stop officials confiscating his church computer files.

He has also been tortured, according to a local news site.


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
Florida Senator Marco Rubio addresses a luncheon at China
Aid's 15th anniversary forum, which honored Chinese human
rights lawyers for their bravery. (Photo: China Aid)
China Aid

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 3, 2017) Senator Marco Rubio urged newly-appointed members of U.S. government to support the cases of imprisoned Chinese dissidents, recounting his meetings with members of a China Aid delegation on social media yesterday.

Rubio, who co-chairs the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, reiterated his support of Chinese dissidents by recounting his meeting with the wives of two jailed Christian human rights lawyers, Jiang Tianyong and Tang Jingling. These women were members of a China Aid-led delegation that met with U.S. lawmakers this week in order to raise awareness of China’s human rights and religious freedom violations.

Rubio posted about the meeting on Twitter and encouraged the Trump Administration and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson to “make their cause our nation’s cause” in a Facebook post on Feb. 2.

Rubio’s Facebook statement can be read in full below.

China Aid hosts delegations, such as the one that met with Senator Rubio, in order to shed light on the horrible abuses occurring within China and promote religious freedom, human rights, and rule of law.




ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here
World
By June Cheng
Posted 2/02/17, 01:53 pm

■ A new book confirms reports that China abuses imprisoned believers

U.S. publishers released an English translation of a memoir by Gao Zhisheng, a Chinese Christian dissident lawyer Tuesday. The book, which details his decade in detention and his hopes for a post-Communist China, follows recent reports that government agents continue to torture Chinese human rights activists while in custody.

Gao, whom WORLD named one of its Daniels of Year in 2012, wrote the memoir in secret while under house arrest in an isolated village in Shaanxi province. The Texas-based China Aid helped smuggle the manuscript out of China. Taiwanese publishers released the Chinese version of Unwavering Convictions: Gao Zhisheng’s Ten-Year Torture and Faith in China’s Future last summer, and when friends sent a copy to Gao’s residence, Beijing officials rushed to rip up the book. They also increased supervision and harassment of his relatives, according to his wife, Geng He.

In the Chinese Communist Party’s eyes, Gao is guilty of publicly opposing the “inhumane, unjust, and evil” government and representing house church pastors, journalists, victims of medical malpractice, and dispossessed landowners. For his “crimes,” police kidnapped him, placed him under secret detention, tortured him physically and mentally, and kept him in solitary confinement for three years. Authorities feared Gao would speak out about the dismal prison conditions, so they kept him separated from the other prisoners.

Gao Zhisheng's Chinese language memoir.
Associated Press/Photo by Kin Cheung
Gao noted that through his darkest times, God has sustained him and kept his hope alive that China would rise up as a democratic country based on the rule of law. “If your only source of space and light is your eyes,” Gao wrote, “your experience of these are greatly reduced [in prison]. … But if you have that space and light in your heart? Those are infinite and cannot be taken.”

Gao’s description of the torture he faced in prison is a window into how China treats political prisoners. In the past few weeks, reports detailed how prison guards tortured four other detained human rights lawyers. Wang Qiaoling, the wife of Christian lawyer Li Heping, confirmed to China Aid that interrogators used electric batons and other torture methods on her husband and fellow lawyer Wang Quanzhang while in custody. Li fainted several times from the electric shock session.

Li is one of the earliest human rights lawyers and over the years represented unregistered churches and blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng. Authorities rounded up Li and Wang Quanzhang in July 2015 during a nationwide crackdown, charging them with “subverting state power.”

In the 709 Crackdown (the name is the date, July 9, the roundup began) police also arrested Hunan lawyer Xie Yang. Recently Xie’s legal team released a transcript with Xie in which he described in detail how interrogators severely beat him, deprived him of sleep, and forced him to sit on a stack of chairs for 20 hours with “both legs dangling in such pain until they [became] numb,” he said.

In order to get Xie to confess crimes he didn’t commit, captors threatened to hurt his wife and children. At one point a captor bragged, “I’m going to torment you until you go insane.”

That threat came true for Li’s brother, Chunfu, a lawyer who was held in custody for 18 months. After returning home to Beijing on Jan. 12 on bail, his wife, Bi Liping, couldn’t recognize the emaciated, paranoid man standing in front of her. Chunfu was hospitalized and diagnosed with schizophrenia. He recalled his captors severely tortured and drugged him. When a local police officer called Bi, she angrily yelled that she had cooperated with the police in not speaking out about his imprisonment, but still “his mind is shattered! Just what did you people do to him?” according to China Change.

While the Chinese government has not responded to these allegations of torture, a recent editorial in the government-run Xinhua relied on its timeworn tactic of claiming American hypocrisy: “Certain Western countries, while turning a blind eye to their own deep-rooted human rights issues, such as rampant gun crime, refugee crises, and growing xenophobia, have a double standard on human rights, alongside a sense of superiority.”


ChinaAid Media Team
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: media@chinaaid.org
For more information, click here