Breaking News:
U.S. News & World Report
April 14, 2015 | 4:01 p.m. EDT

China's new Internet weapon raises the stakes for cybersecurity and takes censorship global.

A powerful new Internet weapon unleashed by the Chinese government against websites working to bypass the country's online censorship was meant to deliver a not-so-subtle message to activists and foreign governments that the Communist nation will escalate efforts to control information on its networks.
By Kevin HoldenApril 14, 2015

Rights groups are pushing for international action on the serial use of lethal force to crush Buddhist dissent.

The United Nations is set to receive evidence that Chinese People’s Armed Police troops have repeatedly opened fire on unarmed Tibetan protesters calling for religious freedom over the past seven years.

Evidence of deadly attacks by the Chinese paramilitary on Buddhist demonstrators across the Tibetan Plateau – provided by witnesses, whistleblowers, and a secret government document smuggled out of Tibet – will be presented to the UN’s Committee against Torture later this year.
Radio Free Asia
2015-04-16

Hundreds of lawyers and rights activists are calling for an independent investigation into the alleged beating of Beijing-based lawyer Cui Hui by court officials in the Chinese capital.

Cui, 51, says she was attacked by judges and bailiffs at the Tongzhou District People's Court on the outskirts of Beijing on April 2 after she went to enquire after a case that should have been resolved two years earlier.
Police wait outside the Christians' gathering. (Photo courtesy
of a church member)
China Aid
By Rachel Ritchie

(Shenzhen, Guangdong–April 15, 2015) Police officers in China’s southern Guangdong raided a gathering in Shenzhen held by a house church late last month, claiming the gathering was “illegal.”

A photo of the scene shows more than 10 police officers standing outside the apartment building in which Christians met for a Bible study on March 31.
CHINA | Great risks, long journeys, government sabotage, official informants, chaotic crowds, packed halls, and fervent prayers: Welcome to a Christian training conference in Hong Kong

World Magazine
By JUNE CHENG Issue: "Surviving ISIS," April 18, 2015
Posted April 3, 2015, 01:00 a.m.

MA ON SHAN, Hong Kong—As the overcast skies lightened on a cool Saturday morning, the sound of 1,500 voices singing Chinese hymns rang out on the grassy YMCA campground in Ma On Shan, Hong Kong. The voices emanated from the main hall, where mainland Chinese pastors, evangelists, and laypeople had squeezed plastic chairs into a space too small for the crowd, leaving only a squiggly shoulder-width aisle to escape. Chairs packed the foyer of the building and streamed out the opened doors on the sides and the back of the building.
Authorities continue to strip crosses from churches in east China despite claims Beijing had ordered an end to “anti-Christian” campaign

The Telegraph
By Tom Phillips

11:47AM BST 15 Apr 2015

Hopes that a government demolition campaign targeting Chinese churches had ended have been dashed after the crosses were stripped from at least three places of worship in recent days.

China has faced international condemnation over the total or partial demolition at least 400 churches in the eastern province of Zhejiang since early 2014.
Al Jazeera
April 3, 2015

Pastor Bob Fu, the founder of China Aid Association, talks about the difficulties many Christians face in China





NPR
APRIL 09, 2015 3:28 AM ET

ANTHONY KUHN

Listen to the Story: Morning Edition | Download

In February 2006, I traveled to the farmland of eastern Shandong province to interview blind activist Chen Guangcheng. He had been abducted from Beijing by security agents and put under house arrest for the past six months.

When I arrived, Chen was closely guarded by men armed with clubs. I couldn't get into Chen's village, so I stayed with a family of peanut farmers nearby.

Their simple farmhouse was freezing cold on that snowy day. My hosts burned peanut shells in a stove to warm the place and cook us dinner.
China Aid
By Rachel Ritchie

(Washington–April 8, 2015) The House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations will review H.R. 1150, the Frank Wolf International Religious Freedom Act, on Wednesday, April 15, 2015.

The bill, which was introduced by Rep. Chris Smith, R-N.J., and Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., on Feb. 27, 2015, aims to update the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 by further developing the government’s ability to combat religious persecution and increasing access to diplomatic training, counter terrorism coordination, and foreign assistance efforts. The bill also extends authorization for the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) until 2021.
Tang Jingling is a human rights lawyer whose clients have included villagers fighting government corruption and victims of illegal land appropriation. Tang's license to practice law in China was subsequently suspended in 2006, after which he became involved in a non-violent civil disobedience movement in China. Tang experienced frequent police harassment and interrogation and in 2012 was detained for five days following his work investigating the death of human rights defender Mr. Li Wangyang. In June of 2014, Tang was formally arrested on suspicion of “ inciting subversion of state power.”

Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org

Liu Ping is a grassroot civil rights activist in China. As a retired factory employee of Xinyu Iron and Steel Group, she attracted widespread attention for independently running for a local delegate to the National People's Congress in 2011. In 2013, Liu Ping was arrested for publicly demanding Chinese officials to disclose their wealth. Liu, an activist of the New Citizens' Movement in China was arrested and sentenced to 6-1/2 years in prison in June of 2014.

Meet All The China 18




China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Pastor Zhang Shaojie, of Nanle County Christian Church in China’s central Henan, is currently serving a 12-year prison term for “gathering a crowd to disrupt the public order” and a fabricated fraud charge.

He was initially detained on Nov. 16, 2013, when authorities asked to meet with him at his church. Instead, authorities bound Zhang, who served as the local head of the China Christian Council and Three-Self Patriotic Movement, and took him into custody (http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/11/update-three-self-sanctioned-church.html).

Authorities detained more than 20 church members, spanning from the day before Zhang’s detention to several days after his detention. The cause of the persecution is said to be a land dispute between the Nanle County government and the church, about which the church sent several groups to Beijing to petition higher authorities there after being unsatisfied with the outcome at the local level.

Heavy persecution of the church continued well into the summer of 2014. On July 4, 2014, Zhang was sentenced to 12 years in prison for his charges despite his lawyers’ arguments, which included the fact that police had essentially kidnapped the alleged victim of Zhang’s fraud case (http://www.chinaaid.org/2014/02/pastors-trial-postponed-story-behind.html).

On Aug. 21, the Puyang Intermediate People’s Court rejected Zhang’s final appeal, leaving him with almost no chance of justice. His lawyers’ had repeatedly asked for a different court to hear the appeal due to the clear corruption of the Puyang Intermediate People’s Court to no avail (http://www.chinaaid.org/2014/08/henan-court-rejects-house-church.html).

Zhang was 49 years old at the time of his detention.

For more information, visit http://www.chinaaid.org/search/label/Nanle%20County%20Christian%20Church?&max-results=25. 

Meet All The China 18


China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Lobsang Tsering, right, and his uncle,
Lobsang Kunchock, at their trial.
Lobsang Tsering was sentenced to 10 years in prison on Jan. 31, 2013 for “intentional homicide” in connection to the self-immolation of eight Tibetans, although five of the self-immolations never occurred. 

Lobsang’s uncle, Lobsang Kunchock, received a suspended death penalty (Editor's note: suspended death penalities are usually commuted to life in prison, unless the prisoner is alleged to have committed a crime in the first two years of his sentence). The older Lobsang was a monk from the Kirti monastery in Ngaba prefecture (Chinese: Aba) in China’s southwestern Sichuan province.

No evidence was presented to justify the sentencing despite an assertion made by a judge involved in the case to the Global Times that “authorities obtained sufficient evidence showing it [the alleged crimes] had been instructed by ‘forces from abroad.’”

However, state run news agency Xinhua reported that the two had passed information to Tibetans in India about the people who had self-immolated, hinting at charges against the two for sharing information with individuals outside Tibet.

The two were detained during a drive by Chinese authorities to criminalize self-immolations in Tibet.

Little personal information is known about Lobsang, who is of Tibetan descent. At the time of sentencing, Lobsang was 31 years old.


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org

Tenzin Delek Rinpoche, of Tibetan descent, was detained on April 7, 2002, by the Yajiang County Public Security Bureau, and falsely charged as the “mastermind” behind a bombing in Tianfu Square in Chengdu, the provincial capital China's southwestern Sichuan province.

Delek was also charged with “suspicion of inciting separatism” and “illegal possession of firearms.”

On Dec. 22, 2002, the Garze Prefecture Intermediate People’s Court sentenced Delek to death with a two-year stay of execution. In 2005, his sentence was commuted to life in prison (Editor's note: suspended death penalities are usually commuted to life in prison, unless the prisoner is alleged to have committed a crime in the first two years of his sentence).

Delek has served 11 years of his sentence. His health is rapidly deteriorating. 

In 2009, more than 40,000 Tibetans signed and finger-printed a petition calling on the central government to retry Delek’s case. 

Delek was born 1950, in Lithang County, Tibet.

Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Gulmira Imin was detained on July 14, 2009 in Asku, a city in China’s far western Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region for her alleged involvement in the organization of the July 5, 2009 protests in Ürümqi, the regional capital.

Gulmira had worked as a website administrator and government employee, a position which she had held since 2000. The website Gulmira administrated reportedly posted an announcement, calling Uyghurs to demonstrate on July 5.

After the events on July 5, Gulmira disappeared for three months. Her family only learned about her detention in October 2009, when China Central Television (CCTV) broadcasted a documentary entitled The July 5 Riot from Start to Finish which named and showed Gulmira, who was wearing prison attire.

The documentary claimed that the July 5 demonstrations in Ürümqi was organized by separatist forces cooperating inside and outside the country, and said that Gulmira was one of six organizers who attended three meetings planning the demonstration. The documentary also claimed that Gulmira had leaked state secrets to her husband. The leaks were allegedly made in phone calls from Gulmira to her husband on July 5.

On Aug. 8, 2012, Radio Free Asia published an article about Gulmira. The article was the first public information about Gulmira's sentence. On April 1, 2012, Gulmira was tried, convicted, and sentenced to life in prison for “splittism, leaking state secrets, and organizing an illegal demonstration.”

During her trial, Gulmira is said to have tried to address the court about torture and other ill-treatment she experienced in a police detention center, which was overcrowded and lacked shower facilities.

Since her sentencing, Gulmira has only met with her lawyer twice. She once appealed her sentence (date unknown), but was rejected. Gulmira is currently held in the Xinjiang Women’s Prison (Xinjiang No. 2 Prison) in Ürümqi.

Gulmira, of Uyghur descent, was born in 1978.


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Alimujiang Yimiti, a Uyghur Christian house church leader, was criminally detained on Jan. 12, 2008, for “inciting separatism” and “unlawfully providing state secrets to overseas organizations” and formally arrested on Feb. 20.

The detainment followed an accusation of “engaging in illegal religious infiltration activities in Kashgar, spearding Christianity among the Uyghurs, and distributing religious propaganda materials to increase the number of Christians” by the Kashgar Municipal Commission of Ethics and Religious Affairs on Sept. 13, 2007.

Alimujiang’s first lawyer was turned away, and it wasn’t until April 18, 2008, that a lawyer was able to meet with him. He was tried in secret on May 27, 2008; his family, including his wife and two sons, was barred from attending. At the trial, it was concluded that there was insufficient evidence to convict Alimujiang of divulging state secrets, causing the case to be turned back over to the Kashgar police for further investigation.

Alimujiang was again charged with “unlawfully providing state secrets to overseas organizations” on July 11, 2009, after more than a year in detention with no formal verdict. The separatism charge was dropped without explanation.

On July 28, 2009, the Kashgar Intermediate People’s Court conducted a second secret trial, once again barring Alimujiang’s family from attending. The hearing was left without a verdict, and Alimujiang was finally convicted and sentenced to a 15-year prison term on Aug. 6, 2009.

Alimujiang’s wife and lawyer didn’t learn of the trial until October 2009, and it wasn’t until December 2009 that they learned Alimujiang’s sentence.

On Sept. 12, 2008, the UN Working Group on Arbitrary Detention declared that Alimujiang’s detention was arbitrary and based solely on his “religious faith and religious acitivites.”

Alimujiang was born on June 10, 1973, in Hami, Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. In 1995, he converted to Christianity from Islam. For more information, visit freealim.com.

Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Chen Kegui, nephew of prominent rights defender and blind legal activist Chen Guangcheng, is serving a three-year, three-month prison sentence for assault in a case related to the older Chen's escape from illegal house arrest.

For many years, Chen Kegui and many other members of Chen Guangcheng's family have been under government surveillance and been threatened simply because they are related to Chen Guangcheng.


On the night of April 27, 2012, more than 10 government officials searching for escapee Chen Guangcheng climbed over the wall of Chen Kegui’s home, forced their way inside, ransacked Chen’s home and beat him and other family members. Chen used a kitchen knife to defend himself.


Chen was subsequently arrested and was convicted on Dec. 3, 2012 of “intentionally inflicting harm.” 


While in detention awaiting trial, Chen was tortured. Furthermore, authorities wouldn’t allow Chen’s family to hire a lawyer to defend him, nor did they allow observers at the trial.


In prison, Chen has been discriminated against, placed under strict control, and been subjected to more beatings. 


In April 2013, Chen had an attack of acute appendicitis, but prison officials refused to provide medical treatment. If left untreated, acute appendicitis canlead to life-threatening complications or death. Prison officials also rejected his family’s request that Chen be freed on medical parole.


Chen was born on June 10, 1979, in Shuanghou, in coastal China’s Shandong province.


(Chen Guangfu's video testimony about his son for the European Parliament hearing concerning the China 18 can be viewed at http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/12/china-16-becomes-china-18-prisoners.html)



Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
On April 25, 1999, Li Chang, participated in a peaceful Falun Gong protest outside the central Communist Party headquarters in Beijing.

Li, a retired PRC Ministry of Public Security, was coercively summoned by authorities on July 20, 1999, two days before the official ban of Falun Gong, and put under residential surveillance for three months until his official arrest on Oct. 19, 1999.

Amnesty International reported that Li had confessed to his involvement with Falun Gong and expressed remorse. However, a lack of transparency concerning the conditions of his detainment causes speculation about the validity of the confession.

On Dec. 26, 1999, Li was tried alongside three other former government officials, who were suspected of Falun Gong involvement, including Wang Zhiwen. The trial, which was nationally broadcast, lasted nine hours and included confessions from the defendants.

The four were charged with “organizing and using a heretical organization to undermine implementation of the law,” “organizing and using a heretical organization to cause death,” which was a charge applied to alleged activities perpetrated by Falun Gong as a whole, rather than activities committed by the defendants, and “illegally obtaining state secrets.” Li was accused of setting up “39 command posts, more than 1,900 training centers, and more than 280,000 contact posts.”

Li was sentenced to 25 years in prison, but the sentence was later reduced to 18 years. He is currently serving his sentence in Qianjin Prison in China’s northern Tianjin Municipality.

Li was born in 1939. He became a Falun Gong practitioner in 1992.


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Guo Feixiong is the pen name of Yang Maodong, a writer, activist, self-taught legal defender. He has been held since Aug 8, 2013 in a local detention center in Guangzhou, south China's Guangdong province for "assembling a crowd to disrupt order in a public place."

Guo was allowed his first meeting with a lawyer in November 2013 after three months in detention and a 25-day hunger strike. He told his lawyer that authorities were accusing him of being the mastermind behind rallies in January supporting journalists at the Southern Weekly newspaper who were protesting censorship. 


In March, Guo was one of the organizers of a signature campaign urging China's legislature to ratify the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Guo is a prominent rights defender who is active in the New Citizens Movement calling for greater government transparency and an end to official corruption. In 2013, at least 60 people associated with this movement have been detained and at least 30, including Guo, have been arrested.

Guo, who had worked as a legal advisor in Gao Zhisheng's law firm, had previously been detained for 15 days in April 2005, for “gathering a mob to disturb social order” after applying for permission to stage a May 4 demonstration. 

He was criminally detained in September 2005 for participating in rights defense campaigns and was kept in custody until December. Guo was also detained and beaten in 2005 and 2006 for helping residents in Guangdong's Taishi village in their attempt to unseat corrupt local officials.

On Nov. 12, 2007, Guo was arrested for supporting Gao Zhisheng and sentenced to five years in prison for “illegal business operations” over the publication of book exposing official corruption in Shenyang. During his time in prison, he was tortured (for details, read his wife's testimony before the U.S. Congress on Nov. 1, 2013: http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/11/bob-fu-guo-feixiongs-wife-and-daughter.html)

Guo was born on Aug. 2, 1966. For more about Guo, see http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/11/bob-fu-guo-feixiongs-wife-and-daughter.html andhttp://www.amnesty.org/en/library/asset/ASA17/035/2013/en/4c1230d8-9ad1-45cb-ab36-17482cd509bb/asa170352013en.pdf

Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Guo Quan is currently serving a 10-year prison term for “subversion of state power.”

Guo was an associate professor at Nanjing Normal University until he was dismissed based on criticism he published, condemning the Chinese Communist government and an open letter to then President Hu Jintao, calling for a “democratic government based on multi-party elections that serves the interests of the common folk.

Much of the criticism concerned the government’s handling of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

Guo also participated in a campaign to protect the rights of demobilized military officers.

In early 2008, Guo, with other plaintiffs, sued Yahoo! for having his name blocked from search results in China. Guo claimed that he lost business because of the removal.

On Nov. 13, 2008, Guo was arrested and charged with “subversion of state power.” 

On October 16, 2009, Guo was sentenced to 10 years in prison and is serving his sentence in Pukou Prison in Nanjing.

Guo’s wife and son fled to the United States on January 23, 2012, where they are appealing for international help to secure Guo’s release. Guo was born on May 8, 1968.



Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Ms. Yang Rongli and her husband, Wang Xiaoguang, were the leaders of the 50,000-member Linfen house church in inland Shanxi province, until they were arrested in 2009.

At the time of their arrest, Yang and her husband were traveling with five other church leaders to Shanxi’s provincial capital, Taiyuan, to petition the government after a series of events involving the demolition of a church in the Linfen house church network and the illegal detainment of a church member.

On Nov. 25, 2009,the group was convicted of “gathering a mob to disturb the public order” because of a prayer rally they held on Sept. 14. Yang and Wang were sentenced to seven and three years in prison and fined 30,000 yuan (US$4,925) and 10,000 yuan (US$1,640), respectively. 

Yang, a 1982 graduate of Linfen Normal College’s Chinese department, was retained by the college to teach because of her excellent academic record. She also worked as an editor and reporter. She is in her 50s. For more information, visit www.helplinfen.com


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Yang Tianshui, born Yang Tongyan, is currently serving a 12-year prison term after being convicted of “inciting subversion of state power.”

Yang, a well-known journalist, participated in the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests. The following October, Yang quit his job to focus on pro-democracy activities, helping found the China Democracy Federation in 1990.

On June, 1, 1990, Yang was arrested and, in 1992, sentenced to 10 years in prison. After his release in 2000, Yang continued to advocate for democracy.

From Dec 24, 2004 to Jan. 24, 2005, Yang was placed under criminal detention by the Nanjing police on the suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.”

On Dec. 23, 2005, Yang was detained without a warrant and held incommunicado at Dantu District Detention Center in Zhenjiang, in eastern China’s Jiangsu province. His family didn’t receive official notice of his arrest and whereabouts until Jan. 27, 2006.

On May 16, 2006, after a clandestine trial, he was sentenced by the Zhenjiang Intermediate Court to 12 years in prison and four years’ deprivation of political rights. He is currently in Nanjing Prison.

Yang was the 2008 recipient of the PEN/Barbara Goldsmith Freedom to Write Award.

Yang was born on April 12, 1961, in Jiangsu. His daughter is currently studying in America.


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Liu Xianbin, who uses the pen name Wan Xianming, is a human rights acitivist, China Democracy Party organizer, and writer and signer of Charter 08, a manifesto calling for reform of China's human rights, is serving a 10-year prison term.

Liu was first arrested on April 5, 1991, for his involvement in the June 4, 1989, Tiananmen Square protests. He was held in Beijing’s infamous Qingcheng prison, where he served 2-1/2 years for “counter-revolutionary propaganda and incitement.”

Liu was detained again in July 1995 after he participated in a petition drive entitled “Drawing Lessons from Blood and Promoting Democracy and Rule of Law,” with Wang Dan and Liu Xiaobo.

In March 1998, Liu wrote an open letter to the Ninth National People’s Congress, demanding the improvement of human rights. The same year, the China Democracy Party was founded, and Liu set up the Sichuan branch in the southwestern province’s capital, Chengdu.

In early 1999, Liu was detained for a month in the Beijing Detention Center. He was sent home and put under house arrest. On July 7, he was criminally detained in Suining.

He was convicted of “subversion of state power” on Aug. 6, 1999, by the Suining Intermediate People’s Court, and sentenced to 13 years imprisonment and three years deprivation of political rights. He was released early on Nov. 6, 2008 for good behavior.

He was detained again on June 27, 2010, and sentenced to a 10-year prison term on March 25, 2011, for “inciting subversion of state power” because of articles criticizing Chinese Communist authorities, which he submitted to overseas websites and magazines. He also received a two-year deprivation of political rights and four months of probation. Liu is currently imprisoned in Chuanzhong Prison in Sichuan province http://www.chinaaid.org/2011/03/christian-political-dissident-liu.html).

On September 14, 2011, Liu’s teenage daughter fled China and arrived in the United States alone, where she now lives.

Liu was born on Aug. 25, 1968, in Suining, Sichuan province.

("Bridgette" Qiao Chen's video testimony about her father for the European Parliament hearing concerning the China 18 can be viewed at http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/12/china-16-becomes-china-18-prisoners.html)


Meet All The China 18




China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Zhu Yufu, a veteran political activist and a Christian, is serving a seven-year prison term for "inciting subversion of state power." Zhu has previously been imprisoned twice for a total of nine years. 

He is currently serving his sentence in east China's Zhejiang province and is in dangerously declining health. His family members fear he will die in prison, but requests for his release on medical parole have been denied.

Zhu's activism dates back to the first pro-democracy movement in Communist China: Democracy Wall which started in Beijing in 1978. Zhu was one of the founders of the Democracy Wall movement in his native Hangzhou, capital of Zhejiang province. 

In 1979, he founded April 5 Monthly, a major pro-democracy publication. In 1998, he was one of the founders of China Democracy Party and served as general secretary of Standing Working Group of Zhejiang Preparatory Committee of China Democracy Party and a member of the Preparatory Committee of National Preparatory Committee. 

Zhu's political activities led to his conviction on Nov. 2, 1999, of trying to subvert state power, for which he was sentenced to seven years in prison.

Following his 2006 release, Zhu was arrested again in 2007 and was sentenced to two years on a contrived charge of obstructing government business.

Zhu became a Christian in 2010.

On March 5, 2011, Zhu was arrested once more, this time for a poem he wrote and distributed online around the time of the Arab Spring protests called "It's Time" that called on people to take to the streets (http://www.hrichina.org/en/content/5790). 

On Feb. 10, 2012, the Hangzhou Intermediate Court sentenced him to seven years in prison and deprived him of his political rights for three years for “inciting the subversion of the state power.”

Zhu was born on Feb. 13, 1953, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang

Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org
Writer, renowned literary critic, one of China's leading political activists, and the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Liu Xiaobo is perhaps China's most well-known political prisoner currently behind bars. He is in prison in northeast China's Liaoning province serving an 11-year sentence for subversion.

Liu first gained attention in the mid-1980s for the radical opinions and sharp comments he voiced in his literary criticisms. After receiving his PhD in literature from Beijing Normal University in 1988, he became a lecturer at the same university. The school was one of the hotbeds of student activism during the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy movement, and Liu was labeled by the government as one of the "black hands" behind the student-led protests and imprisoned for 20 months in Beijing's infamous Qingcheng Prison for "counter-revolutionary propaganda and incitement."

Following his release from Qingcheng, Liu continued writing, focusing on human rights and politics, and the authorities kept him under strict surveillance and banned his books. He ignored friends' suggestions that he take refuge overseas.

In 1995, Liu was taken into custody and held under house arrest for launching a petition campaign calling on the government to reassess the 1989 democracy movement. In 1996, he was extra-judicially sentenced to a three-year labor camp term for co-authoring a declaration supporting peaceful unification with Taiwan.

Liu was president of the Independent Chinese PEN Center from 2003 to 2007 and remains an honorary president, and has been the editor of the magazine Democratic China now an online publication, since the 1990s.

In 2008, Liu wrote Charter 08, a manifesto calling for reform of China's human rights that was initially signed by 303 Chinese intellectuals and dissidents and released on Dec. 10 to mark the 60th anniversary of the U.N.'s Universal Declaration of Human Rights (http://www.charter08.eu/2.html). Two days before its release, police took Liu into custody and he was subsequently charged with "inciting subversion of state power." On Dec. 23, 2009, the Beijing Municipal No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court convicted him of that crime and sentenced him to an 11-year prison term with two years deprivation of political rights.

On Oct. 8, 2010, Liu was named the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, to strong denunciation from China.

Liu was born Dec 28, 1955 in Changchun, the capital of northeast China’s Jilin province.


Meet All The China 18



China Aid Contacts
Rachel Ritchie, English Media Director
Cell: (432) 553-1080 | Office: 1+ (888) 889-7757 | Other: (432) 689-6985
Email: r.ritchie@chinaaid.org
Website: www.chinaaid.org